Abortion Risks for Women

Abortion’s Health Impacts

We should expect, if we believe in natural law, to find those who violate it suffering natural consequences. Thus a general devaluation of human life as a divine gift and blessing results in such violations of natural law as homosexuality, casual sex, and abortion and the natural consequences are serious :STDs, especially AIDS, and a birth rate for most Western societies below the replacement rate.

Abortion and breast cancer

We should expect the thwarting of the reproductive function through abortion (and what could be more a violation of natural law than this) to have consequences for individuals as well as peoples: a causal link to breast cancer has long been argued. Now there is more evidence in a new Chinese mega study.

Researchers from organizations including the Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital and China’s National Clinical Research Center for Cancer in Tianjin pooled results of 36 studies conducted in 14 provinces. They found that a single induced abortion is linked to a 44 percent rise in breast cancer risk; a second abortion to a 76 percent rise, and  three or more abortions to a rise of 89 percent.

Mental Health

Abortion, Substance Abuse and Mental Health in Early Adulthood: Thirteen-Year Longitudinal Evidence from the United States

Sullins, Donald Paul. “Abortion, substance abuse and mental health in early adulthood: Thirteen-year longitudinal evidence from the United States.” SAGE open medicine 4 (2016): 2050312116665997.

34 Pages Posted: 4 Aug 2016 Last revised: 3 Feb 2017

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2813546
and an excerpt

Donald Sullins

The Catholic University of America; The Ruth Institute

Date Written: July 22, 2016

Results: After extensive adjustment for confounding, other pregnancy outcomes, and sociodemographic differences, abortion was consistently associated with increased risk of mental health disorder. Overall risk was elevated 45% (RR 1.45, 95% CI 1.30-1.62, p. < .0001). Risk of mental health disorder with pregnancy loss was mixed, but also elevated 24% (RR 1.24, 95% CI 1.13-1.37, p. < .0001) overall. Birth was weakly associated with reduced mental disorders. One-eleventh (8.7%, 95% CI 6.0-11.3) of the prevalence of mental disorders examined over the period were attributable to abortion.

Conclusion: Evidence from the United States confirms previous findings from Norway and New Zealand that, unlike other pregnancy outcomes, abortion is consistently associated with a moderate increase in risk of mental health disorders during late adolescence and early adulthood.

As for suicide rates after abortion

There is this Finnish study indicating the number of suicides among women in the year after an abortion was 34/100,000, aboout triple the general abortion rater, and six times the rate for women who had borne life children in the last year.

https://www.bmj.com/content/313/7070/1431

And for  the increase in mortality after abortion

From the same (pro-choice, by the way) researcher:

https://afterabortion.org/abortion-four-times-deadlier-than-childbirth/

  1. Gissler, M., et. al., “Pregnancy-associated deaths in Finland 1987-1994 — definition problems and benefits of record linkage,” Acta Obsetricia et Gynecolgica Scandinavica76:651-657 (1997).
  2. Mika Gissler, Elina Hemminki, Jouko Lonnqvist, “Suicides after pregnancy in Finland: 1987-94: register linkage study” British Medical Journal313:1431-4, 1996.

Mental health risks

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2813546

Abortion, Substance Abuse and Mental Health in Early Adulthood: Thirteen-Year Longitudinal Evidence from the United States

Sullins, Donald Paul. “Abortion, substance abuse and mental health in early adulthood: Thirteen-year longitudinal evidence from the United States.” SAGE open medicine 4 (2016): 2050312116665997.

34 Pages Posted: 4 Aug 2016 Last revised: 3 Feb 2017

Donald Sullins

The Catholic University of America; The Ruth Institute

Date Written: July 22, 2016

Results: After extensive adjustment for confounding, other pregnancy outcomes, and sociodemographic differences, abortion was consistently associated with increased risk of mental health disorder. Overall risk was elevated 45% (RR 1.45, 95% CI 1.30-1.62, p. < .0001). Risk of mental health disorder with pregnancy loss was mixed, but also elevated 24% (RR 1.24, 95% CI 1.13-1.37, p. < .0001) overall. Birth was weakly associated with reduced mental disorders. One-eleventh (8.7%, 95% CI 6.0-11.3) of the prevalence of mental disorders examined over the period were attributable to abortion.

Conclusion: Evidence from the United States confirms previous findings from Norway and New Zealand that, unlike other pregnancy outcomes, abortion is consistently associated with a moderate increase in risk of mental health disorders during late adolescence and early adulthood.